What Kind of Line Do Pro Bass Fishermen Use?

In fishing, every aspect has to come together properly for there to be success. One of those aspects is selecting the right fishing line, which is up there with choosing the ideal lure. This is because your line impacts other areas of your fishing experience, from casting and luring to hooking and landing your prized catch.

Today, we’ll be breaking down the three line types applicable in bass fishing, so you can select the right one for your particular fishing needs.

What Kind of Line Do Pro Bass Fishermen Use?

Line Options for Bass Fishermen

There aren’t as many line options available to bass anglers compared to other types of fishermen. In most, pro bass fishers have three lines to choose from, each with individual qualities that make them ideal for specific circumstances.

1. Monofilament

This type of line is one of the classics and has been around for almost half a century. For a time, it was about the only line that was available to bass anglers, too.

Highly castable, with low visibility and great buoyancy, it’s the ideal choice for fishers using floating baits. Also, compared to its two other counterparts—the braid and fluorocarbon—the monofilament has better stretchability, which can be good or bad depending on the situation.

Fishing lines that have more stretch allow fish to get a more secure bite and hold. This quality is what makes the monofilament great for reaction baits. Still, when it comes to any set up that requires a stronger hookset, there’s always a risk of the line snapping, so take some precautions before rigging.

Another thing that the monofilament line is good for that might surprise you is worm fishing. This is because it holds up better around brush, shell beds, and rocks compared to fluorocarbon. Even though it has a bit too much stretch for this particular scenario, you can compensate for that using a heavier rod.

Lastly, by using a mono for your main line and leader, you can give your baits more lift with a Texas or Carolina rig. Unlike with fluorocarbon, this line won’t cause the baits to drag the bottom as much, which means more bites.

2. Braid

Before the monofilament, there was the braid. Although this type of fishing line predates the traditional monoline, it wasn’t as popular and, therefore, wasn’t used as often as its counterpart. It’s advantages lie in its incredible strength despite its tiny diameter, lack of stretch, and extreme castability.

One downside to the braided line, though, is its slighter higher visibility compared to the fluorocarbon and monofilament lines. However, if you’re fishing in low-light or heavy-cover conditions, they won’t really matter as much.

The braided line also comes to the aid of bass anglers fishing in dense vegetation. This line has a bit of an abrasive quality to it, which makes cutting through weeds a non-issue.

One way to take advantage of your braided line’s full potential is to use it with a leader set-up. This allows you to harness the line’s full power without getting exposed to your prey. You can use a simple monofilament or fluorocarbon for this and rig it up to enhance your presentation.

3. Fluorocarbon

The last, but certainly not the least effective, line option is the fluorocarbon. Here’s another strong and reactive option for bass fishers who want a bit of stretch and great abrasion resistance in their line.

What makes the fluorocarbon stand out is that it refracts light the same way as water, rendering it virtually invisible to fish when submerged. A visual presentation that fish aren’t able to see or sense is already a huge advantage for any angler.

Fluorocarbon is also a great choice for reaction and soft plastic baits because of its tendency to shrink rather than float. It can also be used as a leader with a braided line to take advantage of two line qualities when attempting to lure in your next prized catch.

That said, fluorocarbon won’t be of much use for topwater fishing. It is also a poor option to use when fishing for bass amid really heavy cover since it may get nicked up.

What Kind of Line Should I Pack for My Next Bass Fishing Trip?

My Fishing Tools recommends that you pack all three line options on your next excursion. When used in the right situations, the braided, monofilament, and fluorocarbon line options can help you find success on the water.

Still, you need to take note that as crucial as choosing a fishing line is, it’s just one aspect of the preparation process. You still have to consider your leader line, the correct pound test of line, the weight of the rod you’ll use, and other factors that can directly impact your bass fishing experience. Address each aspect correctly, then you’ll surely have a fishing trip to remember.

About Marina Villatoro

Marina Kuperman Villatoro CEO of TravelExperta.com, a travel resource site to inspire families to travel with kids of all ages. Marina has been an expat 20+ years in Central America raising 2 boys in a multicultural, trilingual household. She travels all over the world with her family to give first hand experiences of where to eat, stay and play with kids. Needless to say, it’s never boring! Join Marina on Facebook and Twitter for more unique and boutique family travel!

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