The Essential Guide to Traveling in Japan on a Budget

The question on how to travel cheaply to Japan is of interest to many. The land of the rising sun is a far and expensive destination, so it’s unlikely that you can go on a budget. However, you can quite realistically save on some details. So, how to plan a trip to Japan on a budget?

The Essential Guide to Traveling in Japan on a Budget

Traveling in Japan on a Budget

  1. Cheap flights to Japan: myth or reality?

A direct flight to Tokyo cannot be cheap by definition. If the trip is planned in high season, that is, from April to May it will be expensive. Want to save? Buy tickets in advance. Then the gain can be up to 30% of the cost. And there will certainly be places for the right dates. Choose flights in March and June – they are cheaper and this time will be the best for a trip in order to write your Buddhism papers as a university assignment. It is also worth considering flights with transfers – even if flights are long, but the price difference is noticeable.

  1. Budget housing options

Housing in the country is divided into two types: European and traditional. We think you should spend one night in an authentic oriental atmosphere, even if such lodging costs more. So, consider options where you can inexpensively stay in Japan.

Capsule hotels. Originally created for Japanese businessmen who were late for the night train and were forced to wait for the morning flight. In a hotel of this type, a capsule with a door awaits you, behind which there is a full-fledged berth. This is often all that is required for healthy sleep. Sometimes a shower or bath is included in the price.

Internet cafe. The prospect of spending the night at a table by a computer monitor is not too attractive. This will not happen! Probably you didn’t know it about Japan, but this info can be found in an essay about Japan. Try visiting the cafe closer to midnight. Until eight in the morning you will have the right to lie down on the sofa. Some of these establishments have their own showers, which will also be useful.

Hostel. A common occurrence for the entire civilized world. A bed on the outskirts is really pretty cheap to buy. However, you will have to spend money on travel from the center to the remote sleeping area and back. Many network hostels offer discounts on a loyal customer card. If you travel a lot in Europe and Asia, it makes sense to think about purchasing such a card.

Camping sites. Japan budget travel includes camping. They are scattered throughout the country and are a favorite weekend destination. Overnight in a house or tent is associated with an escape from civilization, with solitude with nature. A place at a campsite will cost several times less than a hotel room. However, you will need to bring with you an awning, and sometimes a rented vehicle. Otherwise, how to get there?

Traveling in Japan on a Budget

  1. Domestic movements

During your stay in Japan, most likely, you will often have to use the services of Shinkansen – new high-speed trains. Moving on to them without a travel card is expensive. Since we are talking about how to travel to Japan cheaply, it’s worth considering buying a weekly JR-pass. People with a tourist visa must have time to buy it before arriving in Japan – a ticket is not available in the country. In the trusted essay about Japan, you can find the information about the cost of a trip. In conventional wagons, it is cheaper than in comfortable “green” ones. If the distance is not long, then it’s quite comfortable to sit in the carriage with a class lower. In order not to overpay.

  1. Where to eat cheaply

Noodle bars. Night fast food stalls are an economical option for a late dinner. They offer large portions of ramen (traditional noodles) at a fairly affordable cost. The noodle bar is recognizable by its long benches, where people are bending over dishes, from which steam rises and an appetizing aroma emanates. 

Eateries. Izakaya is a local diner with traditionally low prices. It serves both Japanese and European dishes. Yakitori is a mini-restaurant where you can really enjoy excellent barbecue from chicken meat and vegetables. As a rule, yakitori are located near the railway stations.

Sushi cafe. A feature of inexpensive establishments is the presence of a conveyor from which everyone takes their favorite dish. You can find out the cost of food by the color of the plate – the list is indicated on the scoreboard or wall. Such establishments are designed for the local population, so do not hope to find the English names of dishes.

  1. Places

There are more than fifty sumo schools in Tokyo and you can get there for morning workouts for free. You can also visit the ancient Tokyo temple – Senso-Ji or the Buddhist temple Zojo-Ji, located next to the TV tower of the city for free. Buddhism is the primary religion of Japan. The most interesting info can be found in the Buddhism essay from our site.

There are many museums in the capital that can also be visited for free. These places can be used as Buddhism essay topics. Among them are the Sumo Museum, the Advertising Museum, the Beer Museum, and the Parasite Museum.

There are many temples in Tokyo and Kyoto. At first, it may seem that they are all alike, but then you start to find your own zest in each one. One of the best in Tokyo is Senso-Ji (also known as Asakusa Kannon). Buddhism research paper topics have the information that this is the oldest Buddhist temple in the city. Life boils in it during the day: hundreds of visitors of different races and religions flock there in streams. Late in the evening, this chaos freezes, and the temple, illuminated by the lights, becomes a haven for photographers who rearrange tripods from place to place in search of a better frame. There you can predict your fate.

Another visiting card of the city is Kiyomizu-Dera (temple of pure water). This is the oldest Buddhist temple in Kyoto, included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Three times a year from 6 to 9 pm it is highlighted with multi-colored lights.

About Marina Villatoro

Marina Kuperman Villatoro CEO of TravelExperta.com, a travel resource site to inspire families to travel with kids of all ages. Marina has been an expat 20+ years in Central America raising 2 boys in a multicultural, trilingual household. She travels all over the world with her family to give first hand experiences of where to eat, stay and play with kids. Needless to say, it’s never boring! Join Marina on Facebook and Twitter for more unique and boutique family travel!

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