My Magical Trip to Glasgow, Scotland

Trip to Glasgow

Having heard of all the things to do in the European region of the world, my eye turned towards one of the most famous places there I wanted to travel to next. If you’ve heard about the Riverside Museum or the George Square, you guessed it right. Glasgow, the largest city in Scotland was where I bought my ticket for. Not just the green and natural environment but the whole landscape appealed to me as something more than just a folklore it was told to be. Having heard more about the Scottish than the land they’re from, I decided to give it a visit to set my perceptions right.

Things to See in Glasgow:

When I arrived at the Glasgow International Airport, the cool Scottish breeze had an impact on its own. Having set foot on Scottish soil, I gazed around and got the view of the Abbotsinch Road leading to a retail park of the same name down the way. From the right, winds blew in to welcome the passengers from the direction of the St. James Playing Fields. I was excited about my journey and couldn’t wait for my experience to begin, so I rejected the offer by Holiday Inn, Courtyard by Marriott and the Travel Lodge to stay. As soon as I could, I took a cab from the airport entrance and took a ride to the nearest coolest place I had heard of, The Glasgow Cathedral. I knew the journey was long but it would allow me to see the city more so I went for it. Along the way, we passed the White Cart River which was looking rather cleaner than most water bodies in cities I had seen. This gave me a satisfaction of being on the clean and fresh soil. The highway M8 led us through the city and as we drove inward, passing the St. Columba’s Church and David Lloyd Glasgow Renfrew. On the right, as I asked the driver about what was the Arkleston Cemetery.

Hillington Road was the famous home to the popular automotive industry giants like Harley Davidson, Jaguar and the fastest bike makers Ducati. Glasgow seemed like a really big city with a lot of vacant land with much room for development. I was beginning to think that the city was deserted until I saw the massive greenery covering the Palace of Art near the Police Scotland. I decided to spend some time here and take a look at the scenery. Much to my amazement, the palace was indeed filled with décor and artifacts that were at least 2-3 centuries old. The astonishing masterpieces were arranged artistically as to highlight the intensity of the cultural context of the region. The Ibrox Stadium was a great view to our left. But I was dedicated to my decision of seeing the top site first.

The cab driver told me of the Festival Park that was the center of attention throughout the year especially in the months of July and August. The great River Clyde was running right alongside us. We crossed it when we passed Hollywood Bowl and were quickly met at the other end by Strathclyde Arts Centre. I was told that once the city begins to unravel itself, the overwhelming attractions don’t cease to appear cascading like a nice feast. The Charing Cross, the famous King’s Theatre, Genting Casino Glasgow on Sauchiehall Road made me rethink my decision and I instinctively told the driver to end the ride there. I tried the Hengler’s Circus since I began to develop an appetite as soon as I landed. I ordered a Skinny Steak and did not regret the decision. After I had eaten, I got to the Willow Tearooms on foot, observing the gentle and comparatively fewer people than in many of the places I had been to. It was surrounded by main buildings of the city. A lot of restaurants lined up on the left and right as I continued my walk. Having gotten to the George Square, I realized why they considered Glasgow to be a magical and beautiful city. The colors you could see there were a sight for sore eyes. It was heavenly to be able to see the architecture and the fabulously aligned decorations throughout George Square. Statues of famous people whom I will not claim to have known of before were present. This gave me a sense of how the Scots perceived their land.

Soon after seeing all the landmarks and the fancy buildings along the way, I got to the Glasgow Cathedral which was my personal favorite. I could imagine myself living near the High Kirk of Glasgow, as it was called by the locals. The huge structure perfectly coinciding with the landscape it is based upon offered more than just an architectural example of a masterpiece. The walls were nowhere near crumbling even though no renovation signs were there. The interior was nothing less than what was described by the books and the people. A pure cathedral that had the windows decorated to show it. The entrance was an overwhelming indicator of what was to come inside. Suffice it to say, I was not the only one in awe at the sights.

All the while when I was lost in the beauty of the city that was before me I had forgotten to give my wife a call that I had left behind and inform her about my safe arrival in Glasgow. Thankfully enough I had a spy phone app installed on my phone so she knew about my whereabouts all the time and I was saved from a quarrel because of the cell phone gps tracker.

Conclusion:

Having spent just a few days in Scotland and even fewer in Glasgow leaves me to think I should go back as soon as I can.

About Marina Villatoro

Marina Kuperman Villatoro CEO of TravelExperta.com, a travel resource site to inspire families to travel with kids of all ages. Marina has been an expat 20+ years in Central America raising 2 boys in a multicultural, trilingual household. She travels all over the world with her family to give first hand experiences of where to eat, stay and play with kids. Needless to say, it’s never boring! Join Marina on Facebook and Twitter for more unique and boutique family travel!

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