3 Extreme Adventures for Adrenaline Junkies

Adventures for Adrenaline Junkies

Hiking to a summit, looking down into a deep, breathtaking gorge, rafting down a wild river – these were considered extreme adventures once, but today, they have become everyday getaways for adventure-loving men and women. There are, in turn, many who would prefer their heart to race and adrenaline flood their body when they get away from their everyday lives – to “feel alive”, as they put it. If you are one of those who wants your heart to miss a beat and feel the flow of adrenaline in your veins, here are a few adventures that might do the trick for you.

Descending into a volcano, Iceland

Thrihnukagigur (Þríhnúkagígur) is a volcano near Reykjavík, Iceland, that has been dormant since the 2nd century BC. It was discovered in 1974 by a cave explorer and opened for tourists in 2012. To date, it is the only volcano where you can descend into the magma chamber – visitors are lowered into the bowels of Mother Earth on an elevator system. It is a thrilling adventure, showing visitors how minuscule they are compared to the forces that created the massive chamber of the Thrihnukagigur – they are lowered to the depth of 700 feet to access the chamber with a surface area of 160 by 220 feet. It’s massive.

The magma that would normally fill the chamber has drained away long ago – scientists don’t know where, mind you – leaving the rift accessible to visitors. And it’s vast.

Scale the highest Via Ferrata in South-East Asia

The island of Borneo is home to the highest peak in South-East Asia. Mt Kinabalu is 4,095 meters (almost 13,500 feet) high – climbing it is a two-day challenge that includes one of the most beautiful via ferrata, equipped with ladders, cables, and bridges passing at a height of around 3,500 meters (approximately 11,500 feet). The view is sure to make your heart beat faster – and the view is amazing.

Cycle the Death Road in Bolivia

The North Yungas Road in Bolivia is a road connecting the cities of La Paz and Coroico built in the 1930s by Paraguayan war prisoners. The road first ascends to around 4,650 meters (15,260 ft) at La Cumbre Pass, before descending to 1,200 meters (3,900 ft) at the town of Coroico. And it has claimed numerous lives over the years – an estimate speaks of between 200 and 300 casualties along the road each year. It was named the “world’s most dangerous road” in 1995.

Since the 1990s, the Death Road has become a go-to destination for mountain bikers – no wonder, as it has a 40-mile continuous downhill section with just a short uphill part. Despite the road was modernized – the construction ended in 2006 – it is still a dangerous one, with at least 18 cyclists losing their lives on it since 1998.

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About Marina Kuperman Villatoro

Marina Kuperman Villatoro CEO of TravelExperta.com, a travel resource site to inspire families to travel with kids of all ages. Marina has been an expat 10+ years in Central America raising 2 boys in a multicultural, trilingual household. She travels all over the world with her family to give first hand experiences of where to eat, stay and play with kids. Needless to say, it’s never boring! Join Marina on Facebook and Twitter for more unique and boutique family travel!

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