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10 Hidden Gems in North Carolina

North Carolina is famous for its charming geographical features. The American state treats tourists to intriguing hiking trails, beautiful mountains, virgin campsites, attractive coastlines, and charming piedmonts. But North Carolina has several hidden gems and offers more than these popular attractions.

You can explore these hidden gems if you live in or around the state. And if you plan to move to North Carolina soon, you can acclimate yourself to your new city by visiting these hidden attractions. Of course, you can do this a few days after your favorite moving company drops you at your new home.

1. Abandoned Henry Hill Mill Village

The history of Henry River Mill dates back to 1905 when it was a famous mill town. Nearly all the inhabitants deserted the village from 1973 to 1987, leaving the ghost town in the hands of its current owner, the 83-year-old Wade Shepherd. The attraction, located in Hildebran, has strange stories of paranormal activities. This could be an excellent place to visit if you have the guts to spy.

2. Castle Mont Rouge in Rougemont

If you are enthusiastic about graffiti, Castle Mont Rouge will be a gem. Robert Mihaly built the castle to use as his part-time studio. Rumors have it that he occasionally uses it to date as a part-time studio. The construction blends Middle-Eastern and European architectural designs, using cinder blocks and marble more synonymous.

3. Graveyard Fields in Brevard

The Graveyard Fields sits at MP 418.8 on the famous Blue Ridge Parkway. The trail is arguably the most beautiful hike in North Carolina. It is one of the hikes you should try if you are in Brevard or any surrounding cities.

4. Cloud Chamber for the Trees and Sky in Raleigh

Raleigh is one of the most livable towns in North Carolina. And while here, there are several attractions and things to do. Apart from the popular ones that you probably know of, the Cloud Chamber for the Trees and Sky is a hidden place you can visit. The chamber, built at the North Carolina Museum of Art, resembles a hobbit house. It features a unique architecture with a round fairy-tale design

5. Blue Ghost Fireflies in Hendersonville

The Blue Ghost Fireflies are not your ordinary fireflies. Unlike the ordinary fireflies, these bugs produce a bluish-greenish light for a month during summer. And they do not flash like their regular counterparts. Instead, they glow. The best time to experience this phenomenon is between mid-May and mid-June. An age-old legend exists that the Blue Ghost Fireflies of Hendersonville are ghosts of Confederate soldiers.

6. Shangri-La Stone Village in Prospect Hill

The Shangri-La Stone Village is a creation of Henry L. Warren. It consists of tiny homes that make up a gnome-sized city of 27 buildings. The village takes pride in contemporary amenities, including a gym, a hotel, a water tower, a theater, and an incomplete hospital. Warren predominantly used stone in the construction of this village. While you may not fit into any of the buildings here, it is a place you should visit.

7. Homeless Jesus in Davidson

The Homeless Jesus features a life-like statue of Jesus wrapped in a blanket and sleeping on a park-like chair. Made by Timothy P. Schmalz and situated outside St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, this figurine has a fair share of controversy over its head. Some Christians think that it is a humble depiction of the modest lifestyle of Jesus. On the other hand, some people see it as disrespect to Jesus since it nearly resembles a similar image in the town that once insinuated the existence of the power.

8. Myers House in Hillsborough

It is impossible to talk about the hidden places in North Carolina without mentioning Myers House, Hillsborough. It is a replica of the famous Myers House but built without blueprints. The masterpiece features incredibly livable interiors and a bookshelf with collectibles from the 1978 Halloween classic movie. The best time to visit this house is in October. However, book a place in advance.

9. Kindred Spirit Mailbox in Bird Island

The unique sighting on Bird Island is the small mailbox that continues to stand there for more than 30 years now. The mailbox, scribbled with the Kindred Spirit, is believed to be erected by Kindred Box himself. It currently contains a communal booklet for signatures and messages of people who visit the place. The notes in the book played a significant role in saving the island from urbanization. It is a place any conservationist should visit.

10. Helen’s Bridge in Asheville

Erected in 1909 to provide access to Zealandia Mansion, Helen’s Bridge stands out as an arched conduit. Tales have it that the mansion was home to one Helen. But a tragic fire claimed her daughter’s life here, which pushed Helen to commit suicide at the bridge. She allegedly hung herself. There are rumors that the bridge is still a haunted place.

Conclusion

We all know the famous North Carolina tourist attractions. But if you plan to live in Raleigh or any other places around North Carolina, you can go beyond the major attractions. The hidden gems are worth a try.

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